Overview

“Who wants to live forever?”

Ah, Lost Odyssey. The game that made me buy an Xbox 360. It just so happened that I once saw someone playing a part of the game that included Jansen. The next thing I did was to go hunt for a used console and a copy of the game. And the rest, as they say, is history. The game was one of the first major titles to be available for the Xbox 360, which is the main reason why it caught the limelight; had that not been the case, I’m not sure it would have made a massive splash. I’m also pretty sure that not many people remember it nowadays, so it hasn’t really developed a lasting legacy. Nevertheless, I don’t regret my decision one bit and would heartily recommend the game to any oldschool JRPG aficionado.

DeathlessPart of Lost Odyssey’s appeal is its association with the Final Fantasy series. It was written in part by Hironobu Sakaguchi, who directed Final Fantasies I to V and produced the rest up until FFX-2, and the music was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, who worked on every game in the series apart from Tactics, FFXIII and its sequels, and FFXV. This should spark curiosity, at the very least, in most FF fans. There’s also the fact that combat is of the traditional turn-based kind, and that one of the characters is an airship pilot whose name sounds suspiciously like Cid.

Yet the traditional turn-based combat is probably also one of the game’s main drawbacks and has definitely proved more trouble than it was worth for more than one player. It can be very frustrating to be forced to select your entire party’s actions before you see what the enemies do, then sometimes having to cancel their actions partway through and queue up something completely different. Especially after years and years of “active” turn-based RPGs where you had a lot more flexibility in that department. The game does try to make proceedings more dynamic with the addition of the ring system, but combat was definitely the game’s big minus for me.

Another issue is the game’s storyline. It starts out on an original note, notwithstanding the painfully clichéd main villain. However, towards the very end, I got the feeling that the screenwriters either lost their script and had to hurriedly scribble down bullet points from memory, or just never bothered writing out the final stretches in detail to begin with. Either way, plot elements came out of nowhere and left me scratching my head in confusion.

Back to the positives, though. The game features some very strong characterisation, considering its unusual premise. Most JRPGs feature a band of idealistic youngsters with one or two kids and an older and/or wiser guy thrown in the mix. In terms of appearances, the Lost Odyssey team is no different. However, it’s a twist on the trope, as four of the “youngsters” have been alive for a thousand years, and have the perspective and mentality to match. Despite not being the most personable guy around, Kaim is given painstaking development through his dream sequences, which sometimes strike deep emotional chords. Jansen is a treasure of comic relief, and I cannot praise his English voice actor enough for his work. Sed is a crusty sea-dog and a mama’s boy rolled into one, and Seth is an inexhaustible source of optimism and energy. The game’s aesthetic also has an engaging steampunk-y edge to it, which does a good job of integrating magic into an otherwise heavily industrial environment. The character design emphasises chiselled, elongated features reminiscent of Gothic statues, which has its own charm and elegance.

All in all, I had a great time with this game, despite its flaws, and would encourage curious players to give it a go. Even though it never was an unmitigated success, it deserves to be revisited for the things it does get right.

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